What does Poor Customer Service REALLY do?

What does Poor Customer Service REALLY do?

We are all aware that poor customer service affects your business negatively. But what makes customer service “poor” and what are some of the negative effects of bad customer service? Poor customer service often consists of automated self-service, long wait times, inadequate attention to detail, and inexperienced customer service agents (Salesforce). Customer service might also be bad because of a rude customer service agent. Perhaps you have to speak with four people before you get the answer you need. These are some of the major bad practices with customer service, but there are certainly others. Here are a few statistics for you that might encourage your business to kick up the customer service a few notches. The Stats: 66% of customers switch businesses due to poor service (Accenture). 40% of customers start purchasing from a competitor because they great for customer service reputation (Zendesk). 25% of customers switch businesses because they are tired of being put on hold (New Voice). 32% of customers change businesses because they are fed up with speaking to multiple agents (New Voice). 53% are irritated if they don’t speak to a real person immediately (New Voice). 56% of customers have to re-explain an issue when speaking to customer service. 72% blame their bad customer service experience on having to explain their problem to multiple people (Zendesk). 58% are willing to spend more on companies that provide excellent customer service (American Express). It is 6-7 times more costly to obtain a new customer than it is to keep an existing one (White House Office of Consumer Affairs). After reading some of these stats, it’s easy to see...
3 Ways to Harness Customer Responsiveness through Technology

3 Ways to Harness Customer Responsiveness through Technology

This past weekend, I was in Vegas for the NADA Convention. I ate some pretty delicious food – a carb-overload to say the least. There was one restaurant I particularly enjoyed, not because the food was so great (side note: it was), but because the customer service was fantastic. Several times, before our table even realized we wanted more chips or water refills, a waiter was right there refilling our glasses or chips. This is one of the keys to great customer service: Meeting a need, sometimes before the customer even realizes it. Great customer service translates into higher customer responsiveness for your business. These days, the right technology is crucial when it comes to customer responsiveness. The use of technology can either make or break your dealership. Effective technology makes all the difference when communicating with your customers. So how can you harness the technology within your dealership to improve your customer service?   1) Make all channels of communication readily available to the customer. As a customer, can I reach your dealership in a way that’s convenient for me? Do I have to hunt for an email address on your website? When I call, does it take several minutes to speak with the right employee? Is there a way that I can communicate with your dealership if I have a quick question? Does your dealership have a successful texting platform? “A 2012 study found that text was the highest rated contact method for customer satisfaction out of all other customer communication channels. Text earned 90 out of 100 points, while phone earned 77 out of 100 and...
Captivated – Your Silent Phone Line

Captivated – Your Silent Phone Line

Countless times, the person working the telephone in the front of the office has been faced with the same dilemma. He or she is helping the customer standing in front of them and the phone is ringing off the hook. Is there a clear solution to this problem? According to officeskills.org, a company that offers resources and training in critical office skills needed to work in the 21st century office, the proper telephone etiquette is the following: “Always focus on the call. Try not to get distracted by people around you. If someone tries to interrupt you while you are on a call, politely remind them that you are on a customer call and that you will be with them as soon as you are finished.” Is it really that simple? Should you really drop everything with the customer in front of you to answer the phone? This is really a lose-lose situation all around. If you answer the phone, you are essentially putting the in-store customer on hold, which is rude. If you let the phone ring, you are sending another customer to voicemail. Either way, someone is left unattended. According to 2014 Temkin Customer Service Ratings, Amazon, Chick-fil-A and Starbucks each made the top 10 list of overall best customer service. In my experience with these companies, I believe they offer great customer service because they make their customers feel valued. I have never had an interaction with any of them where I do not feel like a priority. If you want your company to shine when it comes to customer service, you should strive to treat...
Somebody, Please Pick Up.

Somebody, Please Pick Up.

We live in an age where instant gratification is king. For many, myself included, when we want something, we want it right away. Growing up, my dad liked to give me the friendly reminder from time that, “Patience is a virtue.” While I respect his words of wisdom, I also believe there is a time and place for patience. When it comes to customers, your business is going to get the best results by tending their needs quickly. In the business world, we clearly see how instant gratification comes into play by the drastic decline in the use of voicemail. Recent statistics from Forbes magazine reveal that 80 percent of callers sent to voicemail simply don’t leave a message because they believe their message will not be heard. Additionally, a recent survey by eVoice found that only 33 percent of people listen to voicemail from business contacts, and only 18 percent listen to voicemails from numbers they don’t recognize. Despite some of these shocking statistics, voicemail is still used daily. So what does it look like when voicemail is used? According to a study by Nuance Communications and Research now, most voicemail messages are not heard for at least 8 hours. Furthermore, uReach Technologies says that 30 percent of voicemails linger unheard for three or more days! Let’s be honest. You don’t want to leave a 60 second voicemail after the beep, and you certainly don’t want to listen to one. Your business’ time and energy could be spent doing more productive things, and your customers do not want to wait days to hear back from you. So, as...
3 Reasons Your Business Should Text

3 Reasons Your Business Should Text

  We’ve all been there. You’ve been on hold with your insurance company for ten minutes, passed around to different departments, and no one has the answer to your question. Did you know that the average person will spend 43 days of his or her life on hold waiting for a call? (PR Newswire). Responsiveness is key to the satisfaction of customers, and timely responses can greatly influence your customers’ happiness. As texting is now the most prevalent form of communication in the country, there are important reasons your business should be texting customers. SMS text messages have an off-the-chart 98 percent open rate (Mobile Marketing Watch). In addition, 90 percent of these messages are read within a 3 minutes of delivery (Forbes). Intrigued by the impact texting could have on your business yet? Keep reading. Texting is Efficient. Time is of the essence. Barry Greene, President and CEO of Med Practice Informatics based in Connecticut, says that texting has the ability to dramatically increase office efficiency. On average, practices can reduce staff time from one hour, per doctor, per day to less than 10 minutes by using text messaging (American Medical News). With texting, employees can minimize long, lingering conversations that eat up time. If a customer has a question, he or she can simply send a text message to a business’ dedicated text number. This system is a win for both parties. While that customer is skipping the annoying period of being put on hold, the employee is answering the customer’s question quickly while continuing the work that’s right in front of them. If multiple clients are trying to...